Archive for the ‘Kids and Nature’ Category

Keeping Hummingbirds Safe

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017
Keeping Hummingbirds Safe

 

 

hummingbird_feeder
Photo Credit: Deborah Rivel

Everyone loves feeding hummingbirds!  It’s easy to do and they return the favor by returning repeatedly to your backyard.  There are some specific safety issues you should keep in mind when feeding hummingbirds. Our readers have asked us about two specifically which are common potentially fatal mistakes many people make. And, if you aren’t already making your own hummingbird food, we make it really easy with a simple recipe.

 

1 – Keep the food solution clean to avoid bacteria which may sicken or kill the hummingbirds.  Bacteria spreads more quickly in hot weather so its important to keep all your feeders, but especially those for hummingbirds, really clean.  Here is an article from The Spruce with detailed info on how to clean a hummingbird feeder perfectly.

 

2 – Never buy hummingbird food which is dyed red as it may fatally harm your birds.  Most red-dyed pre-made hummingbird food is sugar water with red dye #40 which is made from coal and petro- chemicals.  It is a known carcinogen and causes a variety of other really horrible side effects.  If you want more information on these pre-made hummingbird foods, please read this article by Julie Zickefoose who is a well-known wildlife and bird rehabilitator, author and natural history artist. She has seen first hand in her patients the effects these products have on hummingbirds.

 

When feeding your family, pets and backyard birds you sure want to make sure you know what’s in the food!  Hummingbird solution is so simple to make and keep fresh that there is absolutely no reason to purchase pre-made food – and possibly endanger the birds you are feeding.

 

Try this really simple recipe for making hummingbird food, which your kids will love making – with your supervision, of course! It takes less than 10 minutes to make and is exactly what hummingbirds need.  Plus,

if you make it yourself, you know the exact ingredients.  And isn’t that the safest way to provide food for your backyard birds?

1 cup of sugar
4 cups of water
Bring to a boil so the sugar is completely dissolved
Let cool to room temperature
Pour into a clean hummingbird feeder
Any leftover should be stored in the refrigerator and make sure its room temperature again before feeding your hummingbirds!

 

Nestcams!

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

 

 
osprey_chicks_nestcam_explore.org
Osprey and chicks, explore.org

 

It’s still nestcam season and chicks are growing. Some have already fledged and others are just hatching.  Keep up with the action right here!
 
 
 
 
 
NEW!! Ospreys, Maine – check in on a nest full of growing chicks!
NEW!! Black Guillemot, Maine

Atlantic Puffins, Maine – hatched!

Laysan AlbatrossHawaii –  Kalama has fledged!  But Pu-unui is still growing!
Empty nest updates:
 

 Bermuda Cahow Bermuda – fledged!

 
Bald EagleIowa – 3 chicks fledged!

Ospreys, Montana – There is very sad news to report.  At this nesting site, food supplies were limited and the 2 nestlings perished as the parents were unable to feed them.

 

 

Join Nestwatch and Help Nesting Birds

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017
Join Nestwatch and Help Nesting Birds

Nobody knows better than you what goes on in the nests in your backyard. If you are curious about the birds nesting in your yard and pay particular attention to

Kestrel_nestbox
Photo Credit: Stan Tekeila

them, Cornell Lab of Ornithology has a great project called Nestwatch that can use your help. They have a list of birds which include Black-capped Chickadee, House Wren, House Finch, Carolina Chickadee, Mourning Dove and many others. Chances are at least one of these birds is nesting in your yard! If you are someone who regularly checks nestboxes, this might be the perfect project for you to take the info you discover about how many eggs, when they are laid, nest success, etc., and send it to Cornell. They use this information to get a better picture of the success and failure rates of nests and nesting habits of different species.

Information like this is particularly important as birds are a barometer for what’s going on in our environment. So, check it out and see if you might become someone who helps backyard birds even more than you do by just sending in the information you already have. It’s a great project to do with kids as well, as they will have the chance to watch and record nesting from start to fledging. And who wouldn’t want to do that?

Nestcams!

Monday, February 20th, 2017
NESTCAMS!

explore_hummingbird_nestcam
explore.org hummingbird nestcam
New nests to watch!

See updates on nests you saw last month and see some new nests we are watching now.  Have a favorite nest cam?  Let us know about it!

Laysan Albatross, Hawaii – who can resist these beautiful birds and their chicks?

Red-tailed Hawks, New York – watch them building the nest

Bermuda CahowBermuda – watch a rarely seen petrel nesting

Bald Eagle, Florida

Allens/Rufous hybird HummingbirdCalifornia



Family Fun: 3 Easy DIY Bird Feeders

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
Winter is a time when birds need a lot of help finding food – especially later in the season when the available
bird_cookies_birdsleuth_heather_katsoulis
Photo Credit: Heather Katsoulis

native berries and seeds are long gone.  Keep your feeders up, but why not try some seriously simple new ways to feed birds in your yard? Take a look at these ideas from making your own treats to making your own feeders out of recycled plastic.  They are fun to do, have a low environmental impact, and so simple anyone can do them. So get the kids involved, and do your own thing for birds!

PINE CONE FEEDERS – The absolute easiest DIY feeder project is also one of the most rewarding. All you need are:

  • Pinecones
  • String
  • Peanut butter
  • Bird seed
  • Tray

Look under pine trees in your yard for pine cones. If you don’t have them there, you can get them at a local garden center. Then do this:

  1. Dust the dirt off each pine cone
  2. Tie a string around each cone near the top, but held in place by some of the pinecone petals, and make a loop so you can hang them.
  3. Give them to the kids to decorate. They will love painting their pine cones with peanut butter (smooth is easiest to work with). Let them go for it and apply it thickly if they want.
  4. Provide a pan of mixed seeds and let them roll their pine cones in it so that the seeds are sticking to the peanut butter.

Now they are ready to hang up and you can wait for the birds to find these very appealing treats!

RECYCLED SODA BOTTLE BIRD FEEDER
– What better way to start off the year than by taking something you are about to throw out and make it useful again! Plastic soda bottles and food containers are perfect candidates for recycling into a bird feeder.

This one is also pretty simple. You will need:

  • 1 or 2 litre clean and dry plastic soda bottle
  • String
  • 2 wooden cooking spoons
  • Utility knife
  • Drill (optional)

Take a look at this video to see how easy this is to do!

BIRD SEED COOKIES – Really? Bake cookies for birds? It seems birds love a good cookie just as much as the rest of us, as long as seeds are the major ingredient. This project is going to require a little more supervision if you are working with kids, but you can make these cookies to be used as ornaments on your outside trees….taking the holidays even later into the season. What you wind up with is really just limited by the shapes of the molds you choose, so get creative!

To do this, you will need the following ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 3 tablespoons corn syrup
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin, such as Knox
  • 4 cups birdseed

For the full recipe and step by step instructions with pictures, check out this link.

A Day at the Beach

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016
A Day at the Beach

What could be more summer-like than a day at the beach? Who doesn’t love having fun in the water and on the sand? And the beach is a popular spot for wildlife as well. Terrapins cross busy streets to get from the marsh to

piping_plover_chick
Piping Plover chick

the sandy shores to lay their eggs, then return home across those same busy streets; horseshoe crabs lay their thousands of eggs along the shoreline, and eating the eggs gives long-distance flying shorebirds the energy they need to complete their migration; Osprey and terns ply the waters close to shore, diving for food; beach nesting birds lay their perfectly camouflaged eggs in the sand

and raise their equally camouflaged young there.  On beaches, there’s a lot going on! And it might not be a surprise to know that birds that use our shores face some big challenges.

Next time you’re at the beach, take a careful look around. All beach nesting birds, like the oystercatchers below,  lay eggs directly on a little shallow in the sand. For their protection from predators, these eggs all blend in perfectly with the sand, as do the teeny chicks who when hatched, are extremely difficult to see. Many areas where birds nest on the beach are roped off so they can enjoy a zone away from the rest of us enjoying the same real estate.

Want to help beach-nesting birds?  Here are some things you can do:
If you see a nesting area that has been roped off, don’t enter it for any reason.  The eggs or chicks, if they have hatched, could be anywhere.  Plus, the adults have a difficult time herding their precocial chicks, and see everything that moves as a potential predator — including pets.  Even if your dog is on a lead and outside the nesting area, his presence can distract the adults who may
oystercatcher and chick at beach
American Oystercatcher and chick on beach

feel they need to leave their chicks to defend against a passing dog. This might lead to an opening a gull or crow has been waiting for to grab an unattended  chick.  Plus some birds, like Piping Plovers, need to safely escort their chicks to the water’s edge multiple times each day to feed them. A busy beach is a challenging place for a beach nesting bird! If you are respectful, they will stand a much better chance of successfully raising their young.


The beach is a great place to spend hot summer days, and its also a terrific place to see wildlife.  Enjoy the beach and be respectful of the wild birds and other animals with which we share it.  This is the best way to ensure they will be there in the future for all of us to continue to enjoy.

More Nestcams!

Friday, May 27th, 2016
More Nestcams!

arctic_tern_chick_nestcam


‘Tis the season!
Birds are still nesting, and this month, there are a few new nestcams including

Atlantic Puffins, Arctic Terns, Allen’s Hummingbird, Peregrine Falcons, Osprey and Double-crested Cormorants.

atlantic_puffins_nestcam

NEW nests with lots of chicks and behavior to watch!

CATCH UP on what’s happening with the chicks:

Ospreys on the Move

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016
Ospreys on the Move!
We promise songbirds will start migrating through soon. Until ospreytrax_mapthen, there is still a lot of raptor activity to keep you busy! Eagles and many hawks are already nesting, but Osprey, who cannot tolerate cold weather, are on the move right now. Having overwintered in South America and Cuba, they are feeling the need to get back north. Learn more about Osprey and follow the migration in real time of birds sporting transmitters at Ospreytrax. You can see their migration in spring and fall and how far they venture from their home sites during the nesting season. It’s a pretty cool thing to be able to track your favorite birds.…and you will have favorites by the end of the first season!

More Nestcams

Monday, March 28th, 2016
More Nestcams
red_tailed_hawk_nestcamCan’t keep your eyes off the nestcams? You are not alone! Keep tabs on the birds you saw hatch and check out some new nesting birds. This month we have new Barred Owls, Red-tailed Hawks and more Bald Eagles.

NEW!!

CATCH UP ON YOUR FAVORITE BIRDS:

NESTCAMS!

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016
NESTCAMS!
It’s that time of year again!allens_hummingbird_nestcam_explore
Get a front row seat and the best view of these early nesters from across the US and  Hawaii  — hummingbirds, albatross and some very cool raptors:

 

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