Posts Tagged ‘animal behavior’

Pesky Critters in Your Backyard?

Monday, July 17th, 2017
 

 

Squirrels got your goat?  Hawks or the neighbors cats using your feeder as a buffet table? Maybe that resident woodpecker is using your house for hammering practice? Whatever the issue is there are often simple and humane solutions! For example, getting the right feeder can help control unwanted birds, or eliminate bees and wasps. This thorough article from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology outlines the most common challenges to backyard birding and ideas to effectively deal with them. Here’s to a safe and cleverly designed backyard!  And one more thing …don’t forget to keep pesticides and other toxic substances out of your yard to keep you and your birds safe.

 

Nestcams!

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

 

 
osprey_chicks_nestcam_explore.org
Osprey and chicks, explore.org

 

It’s still nestcam season and chicks are growing. Some have already fledged and others are just hatching.  Keep up with the action right here!
 
 
 
 
 
NEW!! Ospreys, Maine – check in on a nest full of growing chicks!
NEW!! Black Guillemot, Maine

Atlantic Puffins, Maine – hatched!

Laysan AlbatrossHawaii –  Kalama has fledged!  But Pu-unui is still growing!
Empty nest updates:
 

 Bermuda Cahow Bermuda – fledged!

 
Bald EagleIowa – 3 chicks fledged!

Ospreys, Montana – There is very sad news to report.  At this nesting site, food supplies were limited and the 2 nestlings perished as the parents were unable to feed them.

 

 

Backyard Bird Reading

Monday, July 3rd, 2017
CSM_john_kehe

Nesting birds on the ground in your yard?  What kind of bird does that? We love this humorous essay many of us can relate to.  When it comes to finding out where the birds are nesting in your yard, sometimes info is gotten the hard way. Then It Struck Me and Not Very Gently,  by Murr Brewster for The Christian Science Monitor.

Picture Credit: John Kehe

Join Nestwatch and Help Nesting Birds

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017
Join Nestwatch and Help Nesting Birds

Nobody knows better than you what goes on in the nests in your backyard. If you are curious about the birds nesting in your yard and pay particular attention to

Kestrel_nestbox
Photo Credit: Stan Tekeila

them, Cornell Lab of Ornithology has a great project called Nestwatch that can use your help. They have a list of birds which include Black-capped Chickadee, House Wren, House Finch, Carolina Chickadee, Mourning Dove and many others. Chances are at least one of these birds is nesting in your yard! If you are someone who regularly checks nestboxes, this might be the perfect project for you to take the info you discover about how many eggs, when they are laid, nest success, etc., and send it to Cornell. They use this information to get a better picture of the success and failure rates of nests and nesting habits of different species.

Information like this is particularly important as birds are a barometer for what’s going on in our environment. So, check it out and see if you might become someone who helps backyard birds even more than you do by just sending in the information you already have. It’s a great project to do with kids as well, as they will have the chance to watch and record nesting from start to fledging. And who wouldn’t want to do that?

Nestcams and a Manikam!

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

lance_tailed_makains_lekcam
Cornell Lab of Ornithology Manakam
This month we have nestcams and a cool manakin lek-cam!

If you have never seen manakins displaying, check out this amazing live cam that, if you are lucky, will have Lance-tailed Manakins displaying at their lek. Unlike a nestcam, the action will be sporadic, but don’t miss seeing these amazing little birds displaying for mates in Panama.

Barred Owl, Indiana  – there are eggs!
Bermuda Cahow Bermuda – and there is a super-fluffy chick!

Bald Eagle, Iowa – new chick!

Laysan Albatross, Hawaii – Kalama the fluffy chick is getting bigger!


Birds to See Now: Greater Prairie Chickens

Sunday, April 2nd, 2017
Birds to See Now: Greater Prairie Chickens
In spring, one of the US’s rare birds puts on a show, as

greater_prairie_chicken
Photo Credit: Stan Tekeila

Greater Prairie Chickens look for mates.  Males in the area gather on their traditional performing “leks” also known as “booming grounds” to display on the grasslands for seemingly uninterested females.  To impress them, the males fluff their feathers to create an appealing shape, stomp with fast tiny steps, fend off other potential suitors and make an unusual booming sound by inflating their cheeks.  It’s an amazing and ancient show which attracts birdwatchers from all over, and one which can still be seen in a few states like Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and South Dakota. To see a video of this mating behavior, click here.

Greater Prairie Chickens are endangered in 15 states. As their name implies, they need prairies to survive, and these are in very short supply.  Most prairies have been converted to farmland and grazing, and none of these conversions work terribly well for this bird. These days, most prairie chickens have to make do with a combination of cropland or grazing areas mixed with some patchy pieces of prairie.  But in addition to the degraded habitat, birds have difficulty finding each other to mate since their territories are so fragmented and isolated.  These living conditions are not ideal, and in fact have contributed to the extinction of a couple of species of prairie chicken and caused a massive decline in the populations of others.
If you want to see an amazing annual event that still persists, make your way to a Greater Prairie Chicken booming ground and get ready for an amazing sight.  In many instances you will also be able to see other grouse-like birds mating in the area, as this is the season!  The best way to do this is to take a tour from a responsible operator, as local guides know when and where to find the birds, and how to see them displaying while having with the least impact on them.

Nestcams!

Monday, February 20th, 2017
NESTCAMS!

explore_hummingbird_nestcam
explore.org hummingbird nestcam
New nests to watch!

See updates on nests you saw last month and see some new nests we are watching now.  Have a favorite nest cam?  Let us know about it!

Laysan Albatross, Hawaii – who can resist these beautiful birds and their chicks?

Red-tailed Hawks, New York – watch them building the nest

Bermuda CahowBermuda – watch a rarely seen petrel nesting

Bald Eagle, Florida

Allens/Rufous hybird HummingbirdCalifornia



Duck Mating Behavior

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

Duck Mating Behavior

When you are watching ducks and other waterfowl this winter, get ready for a lot of action, because it’s also mating season!

red_breasted_mergansers_mating_display
Photo Credit: Stan Tekeila

Waterfowl mating behaviors can be pretty weird – ranging from the slightly unusual to the outrageous. We found a few videos you might enjoy for a little insider info on what you might expect to see.

Cornell Lab or Ornithology has this great video and aticle about how to recognize different courtship displays of some of the more common waterfowl you will see.
Another nice video of Cinnamon Teal displaying from Arkive.

How Do Birds Keep From Crashing Into Each Other in a Flock?

Monday, December 19th, 2016
Flock Behavior: Why Birds Don’t Crash Into Each Other
Do you ever watch flocks of birds flying tightly

shorebirds_in_flight_flock

together and wonder how they maintain their distance from one another? Flying in a tight flock helps birds in a number of ways. One of the most important is that a large tight flock makes it more difficult for predators to pick one of them off in flight.
Scientists knew that birds flying in flocks work together as an organic whole to maintain the flock integrity, and don’t follow a leader. But how do they manage avoiding collisions? They discovered that birds flying in tight flocks like this spectacular synchronous murmur of starlings, are able to make quick turns and altitude changes without collisions with each bird making split second decisions as they determine their relationship to the seven birds closest to them.  When within striking distance of another bird, each bird instantly changes altitude and turns to the right.

What birds do intuitively to avoid crashes is what human pilots are also instructed to do when faced with a potential collision!

Late Season Nestcams

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016
Late Season Nestcams!

Many of the birds from the nest cams we have previously been watching are growing up or have successfully fledged.  Now we have a new Guillemot nest, as well as chicks and juvenile laysan_albatros_juv_nestcam birds from some of the nests we have been following. We especially love watching the juvenile Layasan Albatross pictured here.

 

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