Posts Tagged ‘hummingbirds’

Keeping Hummingbirds Safe

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017
Keeping Hummingbirds Safe

 

 

hummingbird_feeder
Photo Credit: Deborah Rivel

Everyone loves feeding hummingbirds!  It’s easy to do and they return the favor by returning repeatedly to your backyard.  There are some specific safety issues you should keep in mind when feeding hummingbirds. Our readers have asked us about two specifically which are common potentially fatal mistakes many people make. And, if you aren’t already making your own hummingbird food, we make it really easy with a simple recipe.

 

1 – Keep the food solution clean to avoid bacteria which may sicken or kill the hummingbirds.  Bacteria spreads more quickly in hot weather so its important to keep all your feeders, but especially those for hummingbirds, really clean.  Here is an article from The Spruce with detailed info on how to clean a hummingbird feeder perfectly.

 

2 – Never buy hummingbird food which is dyed red as it may fatally harm your birds.  Most red-dyed pre-made hummingbird food is sugar water with red dye #40 which is made from coal and petro- chemicals.  It is a known carcinogen and causes a variety of other really horrible side effects.  If you want more information on these pre-made hummingbird foods, please read this article by Julie Zickefoose who is a well-known wildlife and bird rehabilitator, author and natural history artist. She has seen first hand in her patients the effects these products have on hummingbirds.

 

When feeding your family, pets and backyard birds you sure want to make sure you know what’s in the food!  Hummingbird solution is so simple to make and keep fresh that there is absolutely no reason to purchase pre-made food – and possibly endanger the birds you are feeding.

 

Try this really simple recipe for making hummingbird food, which your kids will love making – with your supervision, of course! It takes less than 10 minutes to make and is exactly what hummingbirds need.  Plus,

if you make it yourself, you know the exact ingredients.  And isn’t that the safest way to provide food for your backyard birds?

1 cup of sugar
4 cups of water
Bring to a boil so the sugar is completely dissolved
Let cool to room temperature
Pour into a clean hummingbird feeder
Any leftover should be stored in the refrigerator and make sure its room temperature again before feeding your hummingbirds!

 

Cuban Bee Hummingbird in Action!

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017
Whoa!  Fabulous Slo-motion of a Bee Hummer in action from National Geographic.  Check it out!
 

See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion

Where human eyes see only a hovering spot of color, high-speed cameras capture the breathtaking maneuvers of a hummingbird in flight. http://on.natgeo.com/2sY92F8

Posted by National Geographic Magazine on Monday, July 10, 2017

Why Hummingbirds Are So Cool

Monday, July 10th, 2017
Hummingbirds are definitely cool. Maybe its their size,
bee_hummingbird
Bee Hummingbird
Photo Credit: Deborah Rivel
or some of the extraordinary iridescent colors, or maybe their extreme energy. Ever wonder how fast they can fly or breathe?  What they weigh? How long they live? Fret no more!  All this and more can be found in 25 Fun Facts About Hummingbirds from The Spruce.  
 
Oh, and if you are wondering what the teeniest hummer is….spoiler alert, its this itty Bee Hummingbird from Cuba pictured here. 

 

More Nestcams!

Friday, May 27th, 2016
More Nestcams!

arctic_tern_chick_nestcam


‘Tis the season!
Birds are still nesting, and this month, there are a few new nestcams including

Atlantic Puffins, Arctic Terns, Allen’s Hummingbird, Peregrine Falcons, Osprey and Double-crested Cormorants.

atlantic_puffins_nestcam

NEW nests with lots of chicks and behavior to watch!

CATCH UP on what’s happening with the chicks:

NESTCAMS!

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016
NESTCAMS!
It’s that time of year again!allens_hummingbird_nestcam_explore
Get a front row seat and the best view of these early nesters from across the US and  Hawaii  — hummingbirds, albatross and some very cool raptors:

Planting For Hummingbirds

Sunday, June 21st, 2015

Planting for Hummingbirds

Who doesn’t love hummingbirds in their garden? You may already set up hummingbird feeders filled with sugar water, but feeders can require a lot of maintenance, as they must be kept cleaned and filled with fresh food.   A

bee_balm
Bee Balm

better option might be to plant native flowers to attract hummingbirds.

As a general rule, hummingbirds like the color red which is why most hummingbird feeders are red, or have red feeding tubes. Sometimes you can buy  pre-made hummingbird food which is dyed red, but please don’t buy this as it can be fatal to the birds. Cardinal Flower and Bee Balm are both bright red flowers that attract hummingbirds and they are exactly what hummingbirds want and need. Bee Balm, also known as Bergamot, has another use after it stops flowering — you can dry Bergamot leaves, crush them and use them as a replacement for oregano.

Lupine is a beautiful purple flower that is easy to grow. In some parts of the country it almost grows like a weed, and you’ll see it in highway ditches. Lupine is a low-maintenance flower that will brighten your yard and attract hummingbirds.

No space for a garden? Any of these flowers will grow wonderfully in a window box or ceramic pot — just put them on your balcony where hummingbirds can see them.

Planting native flowers around your home that offer hummingbirds nectar, is fun to do, and will keep those hummingbirds coming to your house all summer long. For more native planting ideas, visit the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Tiny Bird With a Big Story

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

Hummingbirds have many challenges – they are tiny and yet need to be some of the toughest birds out there. They live in conditions where eeking out a living can be a challenge – especially when you have to feed at frequent intervals just to keep going. In the cloud forests of Peru, there is a hummingbird – the male of which has a tail that defies all probabilities of flight. The Spatuletail Hummingbird’s tail appears to give no benefit to flight which is key to how we think about hummingbird aerodynamics. The BBC filmed the mating displays of this amazing little bird struggling to impress a female. Sometimes the truth is even more interesting than anything you could ever make up.

Photo Credit: BBC

 

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